Welcome!

Welcome to Lainey Feingold’s website. Lainey is a disability rights lawyer who works primarily with the blind community on technology, digital, and information access issues. She is nationally recognized for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and for pioneering the collaborative dispute resolution method known as Structured Negotiation.

In 2014 Lainey was honored with a California Lawyer Attorney of the Year (CLAY) award. She also received a CLAY Award in 2000.

In the Fall of 2016 the American Bar Association will publish Lainey’s book about Structured Negotiation. Read about Lainey’s book.

This website was designed to be usable by people with and without disabilities. Read our Accessibility Statement for more information.

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Photo credit: Ahri Golden

Structured Negotiation

Structured Negotiation is an alternative dispute resolution process with a powerful track record. Without lawsuits, the Law Office of Lainey Feingold and others have used the method for twenty years to negotiate comprehensive agreements with some of the largest organizations in the United States.  Bank of America, Major League Baseball and the City and County of San Francisco have all participated in Structured Negotiation. Developed to resolve civil rights claims of blind people, the method has application to a wide variety of civil claims where parties seek collaboration and solution over conflict and expense. In 2016 the American Bar Association will publish Lainey Feingold’s book about this ground-breaking method of resolving legal claims.  Read more about Structured Negotiation.

Recent Articles

Judging a Book by its Cover

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This post is about the hexagons on the cover of my forthcoming book — Structured Negotiation: a Winning Alternative to Lawsuits. The book will be published by the American Bar Association (ABA) next month. Hexagons are the perfect symbol for a book about cooperation, trust, and resolving legal claims without the conflict, expense and stress of traditional litigation. Read more…

Care about Digital Access? Let the U.S. Government Know

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The United States Department of Justice needs to hear that web accessibility regulations matter to disabled people. Can you help? This post will explain how. A new government notice  asks 123 questions about public sector web accessibility.  You can read the full notice, but you don’t have to read all the questions, or even answer any particular one.  The most important thing people who care about full digital equality and inclusion can do is tell the government why public sector web accessibility matters. Read more…

E*Trade Announces Accessibility Initiative

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NEW YORK, JUNE 21, 2016 – E*TRADE Financial Corporation (NASDAQ:ETFC) today announced an initiative to enhance its website, mobile applications, and desktop trading and investing platforms to make them more accessible for customers with disabilities. E*TRADE worked with representatives of the blind community to enhance its platforms for traders and investors with visual impairments: Having full access to financial investing tools is important for everyone. I’m happy that E*TRADE will make its web and mobile platforms more accessible, particularly for people who are blind or partially sighted, when it comes to all aspects of trading and investing.Pratik Patel, long-time E*TRADE customer who is blind Read more…