U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear The Domino’s Case (Hooray!)

Great news for advocates of digital inclusion for people with disabilities! Today the United States Supreme Court rejected Domino’s Pizza’s efforts to overturn the Ninth Circuit federal appeals court opinion in the Domino’s web and mobile accessibility case. That appeals court opinion said that disabled people can bring claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act if a website or mobile application is not accessible. Read more…

California Pays 66 Million Dollars for an Inaccessible Website. Lawsuit Follows

Imagine this: Two companies charge the State of California sixty six million dollars to build a website for a state park reservation system. (Yes, $66,000,000.00). The contract requires the website to work for all California residents, including those with disabilities. (In other words, the website is supposed to be accessible.) The website gets delivered, but is not in fact accessible. Read more…

Happy Birthday WCAG — Now You are Twenty!

On May 5, 1999 the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) issued a press release announcing the publication of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0. The headline was confident: “WAI Provides Definitive Guidance for Web Access by People with Disabilities.” Let’s honor WCAG’s birthday by redoubling efforts to make the promise of the web a reality — let’s make it available to everyone, including people with disabilities. Read more…

Big Win for Web Accessibility in Domino’s Pizza Case

[UPDATE: On October 7, 2019 the United States Supreme Court announced it would not hear, would not rule on, the Domino’s case. On June 13, 2019 Domino’s asked the United States Supreme Court to hear this case and reverse this decision. Read the October 7, 2019 post on this website about the Supreme Court’s announcement.]… Read more…

Asking about compliance? You may be asking the wrong question

During a recent presentation about the digital accessibility legal space I was asked a question. It was about a word that pops up with increasing frequency as fear of lawsuits drives too much of the digital accessibility world. The “C” word — compliance. The question was this: If the captions on online videos are 65% accurate do you think that would comply with legal responsibilities?audience question This is the kind of question that arises when people are driven by fear. When people forget what accessibility is about. Even forget what the law is about. Read more…