60 Minutes Slams ADA, Boosts Trump Agenda

On December 4th, 60 Minutes aired a 13 minute story on “drive by lawsuits” under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The segment, which followed a puff piece on Paul Ryan, questioned lawsuits filed by three lawyers, two of them being sued by their disabled clients for malpractice. Anderson Cooper, the show’s host, did not mention… Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (December 2015)

This post is part of an occasional series about recent legal developments impacting technology and information access for people with disabilities. This post covers activity from August 11, 2015 through December 10, 2015. This update includes Department of Justice activity, the settlement of cases against Scribd and the General Services Administration, Structured Negotiation with Humana, an important new voting rights case, and other developments. Read more…

Blind Does not Mean Oblivious

On June 16, 2015 the New York Times ran an article in the Science Section about childhood obesity. The piece was about parents who deny that their kids are obese, thereby fueling what the Times terms the “childhood obesity epidemic.” What headline did the nation’s paper of record chose for this article in the print edition? The editors chose the headline “Blind to a Child’s Obesity.” The parents (and grandparents) featured in the piece were all sighted, and so were their kids. “Blind” was the Times’ way of saying that these parents were oblivious, ignorant, and didn’t have their children’s best interests at heart. Read more…

Kitty Cone, Progressive Activist and Disability Rights Leader, Dies at 70

Kitty Cone’s final Facebook post was dated February 14, 2015. “Excellent explanation of dangers of fracking,” she wrote above a Sierra Club video explaining the dirty energy process. It was a fitting social media ending for the life long activist who died on March 21, 2015 at the age of 70. With Kitty’s death the world has lost a fighter for social justice and a woman of fierce commitment to progressive ideals and to equality in all it forms. Her family has lost a beloved member, her son Jorge a wonderful mother. I and countless others have lost a loyal, supportive, kind friend. Read more…

Twenty Five Years From Today

What will the digital world be like in 2040? Will we even use the term ‘digital?’ Will accessibility and usability be integrated into the new reality? And just how many “things” will be part of the web of things? A workshop Lainey Feingold is co-facilitating at the 2015 Jacobus tenBroek Disability Law Symposium will explore these very questions. Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (CSUN 2015)

This post is a version of the presentation Lainey Feingold gave in March 2015 at CSUN – the International Technology and People with Disabilities conference held annually in San Diego, California and sponsored by California State University Northridge (CSUN). The presentation covered legal developments in digital accessibility since CSUN14 (March 2014 through March 7, 2015). Read more…

More Talking ATMs Expected Across India

Twelve years after the first Talking ATM was installed in the United States, accessible banking technology continues to spread across the globe. This month the Reserve Bank of India urged all financial institutions in the country to make sure all new ATMs are Talking. Read more…

GAAD 2014: People are Different and We All Use Technology. Why Isn’t More of it Accessible?

May 15 2014 is the third annual Global Accessibility Awareness Day, or GAAD. The day was conceived by Los Angeles web developer Joe Devon and accessibility virtuoso Jennison Asuncion. Virtual and live events are being held around the globe to bring attention to a simple idea: People are different, and we use digital devices and consume digital content in different ways. Read more…

DOJ Delays Web Accessibility Regulations

Earlier this month the United States Department of Justice admitted what many of us have suspected: we will not be seeing web accessibility regulations in the United States for commercial and public entities any time soon. Some time in 2013 at the earliest. In July, 2010, the Department issued what is called an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rule Making indicating that it was planning to issue regulations about web accessibility. The step after an “Advanced Notice” is a “Notice of Proposed Rule Making” (NPRM). After that is the rule itself. In its semi-annual regulatory agenda for Spring 2011, however, the DOJ called the NPRM for Web Accessibility a “Long Term Item” not expected until December, 2012. That’s well over a year from now. And it is close to two years after the public comment period on the Advanced Notice closed, and almost two and one half years after the DOJ announced the possible regulations in July, 2010. Read more…

Revised ADA Regulations (Finally) Include Detailed Talking ATM Requirements

On September 15, 2010, the United States Department of Justice published, in the Federal Register, its revised rules implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act. Official publication is one of the last steps on a very long road leading to new ADA regulations for both public and private entities on a diverse set of issues including Talking ATMs, ticketing for accessible seating, effective communication, service animals and more. The next steps? The new rules take effect on March 15, 2011 – six months after publication in the Federal Register. Compliance with the new 2010 Standards for Accessible Design (revising what is often erroneously referred to as ADAAG), is required as of March, 2012. Read more…