Accessibility Lawsuit Filed Against JetBlue Airways

The California Council of the Blind and three California residents with visual impairments have filed a lawsuit against JetBlue Airways in Federal Court for the Northern District of California. The lawsuit alleges that JetBlue has violated California law by maintaining a website and operating airport check-in kiosks that are inaccessible to individuals with visual impairments. The lawsuit is based on three California laws: the Unruh Act, the California Disabled Persons Act, and the California Unfair Competition Law. Read more…

Accessible Websites, One Small Law Firm, and the U.S. Department of Justice

Can a small law firm’s website help the United States Department of Justice in its web accessibility rulemaking process? When the website — LFLegal.com — has been designed to meet Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, I think the answer is yes. In its July 26, 2010 Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking about web accessibility, the United States Department of Justice asks several questions about how web accessibility regulations might affect small businesses. This post provides information about the accessibility of this law firm’s (a small business) website, and is intended as a resource for individuals and organizations preparing comments in response to the DOJ ANPRM. Read more…

Blind Advocacy for Accessible Technology Has Rich California History

October 10 – 16, 2010, has been designated by the California legislature as the state’s first ever “Disability History Week.” The official designation is the result of disability community advocacy efforts spearheaded by “Youth Organizing! Disabled and Proud”, a project of the the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers. This historic week provides a welcomed opportunity to look at the history made by blind advocates and their organizations in California as part of the on-going push for accessible technology. Read more…

Web Accessibility, Structured Negotiations and DOJ Rulemaking

On July 26, 2010, the United States Department of Justice issued an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on the issue of website accessibility. The Notice asks a series of questions for the public to answer to help the Justice Department in its rulemaking process. This post provides information, resources and examples of large commercial websites that have been designed to meet accessibility standards. These sites are operated by some of the largest entities in the United States, including Bank of America, Major League Baseball and CVS. These corporations, and the others referenced here, have made their websites accessible without litigation as a result of Structured Negotiations and other advocacy efforts. Read more…

ADA Twentieth Anniversary Rule Making from Department of Justice

Breaking News Update! The U.S. Department of Justice has published Advanced Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on four issues of importance to the disability community. Earlier News Update! The U.S. Department of Justice has announced that on July 26 it will issue Advanced Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on four issues of importance to the disability community. The Notices will address web accessibility for entities covered by the ADA, movie captioning and video description, accessibility of next generation 9-1-1, and accessibility of equipment and furniture in covered entities. Read more…

Major League Baseball: All Star Ballot with Audio CAPTCHA

For the second year in a row, Major League Baseball’s on-line ballot for All Star Voting has an audio CAPTCHA. This accessible security feature allows visually impaired fans to independently cast their all star votes on line. The audio CAPTCHA is part of Major League Baseball’s on-going initiative to improve on-line accessibility for blind baseball fans. Read more…

MLB.com Opening Day Accessibility Update

The 2010 baseball season has started and with it come accessibility improvements to mlb.com. Yes, there will no doubt be glitches and outstanding issues as the season gets underway. We are confident that MLB wants to and will continue to make improvements, and we encourage fans with visual impairments to send specific feedback to MLB through the channels listed in this post. In this post you can find information about the 2010 MLB media players and the new on-line accessibility resources on mlb.com. You can also find information on how to contact MLB about accessibility issues. Read more…

MLB.Com: Gearing up for Opening Day Accessibility

This is a pre-opening day update about accessibility improvements to mlb.com and the 2010 audio and video players. This information will be updated on this site and on Brian Charlson’s website. MLB has been working very hard to ensure that this year’s video and audio players are accessible, and the ACB MLB accessibility group has been working closely with them in this effort. One thing we have learned in the process is that changes to the whole site — not just accessibility — are being made up to the very last moment. Read more…

Boston Globe Story about Brian Charlson and MLB.com Access Improvements

Blind Sox Fan Gets MLB to Even Game Like any true Red Sox fan, Brian Charlson attends as many games as possible and listens to the rest, play by play, on the radio. But when it came to reading stats, his blindness sometimes got in the way. Not any longer. At the urging of Charlson and fellow advocates, Major League Baseball rolled out a series of accessibility features this week on all league and team websites aimed at making statistics, ticketing, and other information fully accessible to the visually impaired. “It’s exciting that MLB has joined with us in this effort, hearing what the blindness community needs to take full advantage of this wonderful thing that is baseball. They are setting the stage for other sports to do likewise. Next season I’ll be asking the NFL, and I’ll say, ‘See what MLB can do? You don’t want to be outshined by the MLB.’” Read more…

Web Accessibility Press Coverage on New Year’s Day

Web more accessible to those with disabilities (article appearing on page 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle on January 1, 2010, by staff writer Alejandro Martínez-Cabrera) San Francisco, CA (January 1, 2010)– During her high school years, Lisamaria Martinez, who has been visually impaired since she was 5, carried a 25-pound backpack to school crammed with books written in Braille. But once she was introduced to the Web at UC Berkeley, she started getting professors’ class notes by e-mail, using text-to-speech software, and trading heavy Braille tomes for a few words and a click on a search engine. Read more…