Talking Prescription Labels: Spring 2016 Update

Without accessible prescription labels, blind people are forced to guess about the medication in their prescription containers. Would a pharmacy give medication to sighted consumers without a label? Of course not. A growing number of pharmacy chains and health care organizations in the United States now offer talking prescription labels and other forms of accessible prescription information for customers who cannot read standard print. This post will give you the details. Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (December 2015)

This post is part of an occasional series about recent legal developments impacting technology and information access for people with disabilities. This post covers activity from August 11, 2015 through December 10, 2015. This update includes Department of Justice activity, the settlement of cases against Scribd and the General Services Administration, Structured Negotiation with Humana, an important new voting rights case, and other developments. Read more…

More Delay for Federal Pedestrian Signal Regs

In 1999 a little known federal agency called the United States Access Board had a good idea. Nine years after passages of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Board issued an official notice of its “intent to establish a Public Rights-of-Way Access Advisory Committee.” The committee’s job was to make recommendations for accessibility guidelines for public rights-of-way covered by the ADA. Read more…

Fall 2015 Update: More Delay for DOJ Web Regulations

Every six months, agencies in the United States federal government must notify the public about the status of pending regulations. On November 19, 2015, The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) gave an update about pending regulations regarding the accessibility of websites. As the agency has done many times before, the update boils down to a five letter word: Delay. Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (Summer 2015)

This post is part of an occasional series about recent legal developments impacting technology and information access for people with disabilities. This post covers activity from March 12, 2015 through August 10, 2015. You can find earlier Updates in the Legal Updates Category of this website. The series is illustrated by a toolbox — because law has proven an effective tool to improve the accessibility and usability of digital content, print information and technology for everyone. There are many ways to use the law, reflected by the many tools in the toolbox and by the updates reported in this post. Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (CSUN 2015)

This post is a version of the presentation Lainey Feingold gave in March 2015 at CSUN – the International Technology and People with Disabilities conference held annually in San Diego, California and sponsored by California State University Northridge (CSUN). The presentation covered legal developments in digital accessibility since CSUN14 (March 2014 through March 7, 2015). Read more…

Digital Accessibility Legal Update (December 2014)

This post is about recent legal developments in the United States impacting technology and information access for people with disabilities. It contains developments ocurring between July 16 and December 15, 2014 and is part of an occasional series. The series is illustrated by a toolbox — because law has proven an effective tool in improving the accessibility and usability of digital content, print information and technology for everyone. There are many ways to use the law, reflected by the many tools in the toolbox. Read more…

More Delay for DOJ Web Regs – Does it Matter?

Surprise Surprise. The United States Department of Justice has announced another delay in its long awaited web accessibility regulations. Does it matter? Even though it can’t seem to issue web accessibility regulations, the United States Department of Justice has recently been a forceful advocate for web accessibility. The Department has been crystal clear that the ADA requires websites to be accessible. Read more…