Mass. Eye and Ear, Bay State Council of the Blind Launch Collaboration

Mass. Eye and Ear Launches Collaboration with Bay State Council of the Blind to Improve Access. January 24, 2017 (Boston) – In partnership with the Bay State Council of the Blind, Massachusetts Eye and Ear today announced the launch of a comprehensive initiative to ensure that persons with visual disabilities have full and equal opportunity to the best possible care. Issues addressed in the initiative include web accessibility, alternative formats, and training. Read more…

Structured Negotiation Book Event at 2017 CSUN Conference

To match the fast pace of the CSUN Assistive Technology Conference, Lainey Feingold will hold a lightning book event after the first full day of conference events. Join her in The Deque Presentation Room (Ballroom F) at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego, California from 5:15 – 6:00 on Wednesday March 1 to hear stories from her book, Structured Negotiation, A Winning Alternative to Lawsuits. Read more…

The Motley Fool Announces Accessibility Initiative

Alexandria Va.,-January 13, 2017-The Motley Fool today announced enhancements to its websites, mobile applications and emails to provide increased accessibility for individual investors with disabilities. “The ‘Motley’ in our name illustrates that our mission is to help people in all circumstances and in all stages of life,” said Chris Harris, Accessibility Project Manager at The Motley Fool. “We are excited that our enhanced services will allow us to reach and serve a broader community of Fools on their investing journeys.” Read more…

The Motley Fool Accessible Information Agreement

Congratulations to The Motley Fool! Posted here is the digital accessibility settlement agreement The Motley Fool reached with blind investors to ensure that its award-winning website, mobile application and emails are available to people with and without disabilities. The Motley Fool participated in Structured Negotiation — no lawsuit was needed or filed. Read more…

Structured Negotiation Talks in Toronto and Windsor

It will be cold, but it will be fun! From February 7 – February 10 Lainey Feingold will be speaking at several events in Toronto and Windsor Canada about her book Structured Negotiation a Winning Alternative to Lawsuits and about the state of digital accessibility law and advocacy in the United States. Most of these events, described below, are open to the public. A huge thank you to David Lepofsky for organizing Lainey’s trip, and for Osgoode Hall Law School for sponsorship. Read more…

When all You Have is a Hammer

Over the holidays I took a walk along San Francisco’s iconic Haight Street. When I saw a giant hammer mounted on the Roberts Hardware sign (included in this post) I knew I wanted to write about one of my favorite Structured Negotiation themes. “When all you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail” is an idea that appears in my book on page three. Read more…

Digital Access Legal Update – December 2016

This post includes legal developments about digital accessibility between May 8, 2016 and December 12, 2016. This is the final update during the Obama administration, an eight year period that has seen an explosion of legal activity by the federal government advancing digital accessibility. I wrote two pieces about how I think the election will impact the legal push for digital accessibility. Read more…

60 Minutes Slams ADA, Boosts Trump Agenda

On December 4th, 60 Minutes aired a 13 minute story on “drive by lawsuits” under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The segment, which followed a puff piece on Paul Ryan, questioned lawsuits filed by three lawyers, two of them being sued by their disabled clients for malpractice. Anderson Cooper, the show’s host, did not mention… Read more…

Digital Accessibility in the New Political Reality

Five days before the election I wrote a post about what a Donald Trump presidency could do to the ongoing struggle for equality in the digital space. I wrote from my heart and from a place of fear. While I am despondent over the election, and still believe what I wrote on November 3, I realize it was only half the story. Now I feel a new responsibility: to remind us all that digital accessibility is here to stay. That despite obstacles the new administration will throw in the path of progress, disabled people will continue to insist on their civil rights. And the law, possibly battered and bruised, or temporarily in retreat, will be there to help. Read more…