The Motley Fool Announces Accessibility Initiative

Congratulations to The Motley Fool! The financial services company has announced its commitment to digital accessibility with the press release posted below. The Motley Fool’s initiative applies to its award-winning website, as well as its mobile application and email channel.

Digital accessibility ensures that online and mobile content is available to people with and without disabilities. The company worked in Structured Negotiation with blind investors. The Law Office of Lainey Feingold and Linda Dardarian of the Oakland civil rights firm Goldstein, Borgen, Dardarian & Ho represented the blind investors. No lawsuit was filed or needed. Learn more about Structured Negotiation in Lainey’s 2016 book published by the American Bar Association.

share on twitter


The Motley Fool Enhances Site for Accessibility

Alexandria Va., January 13, 2017 The Motley Fool today announced enhancements to its websites, mobile applications and emails to provide increased accessibility for individual investors with disabilities.

The ‘Motley’ in our name illustrates that our mission is to help people in all circumstances and in all stages of life. We are excited that our enhanced services will allow us to reach and serve a broader community of Fools on their investing journeys.Chris Harris, Accessibility Project Manager at The Motley Fool

The enhancements were made with input from a community of blind individual investors with the goal of delivering The Motley Fool’s award-winning information and financial solutions to members of the public with visual impairments.

Having full access to financial investing tools is important for everyone. I’m happy that The Motley Fool will make its web and mobile platforms more accessible, particularly for people who are blind or partially sighted, so all individual investors can invest better. Thomas Foley, visually impaired investor

About Digital Accessibility

The Motley Fool adopted the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.0 level AA as its website, mobile, and email accessibility standard, and has made substantial enhancements to meet this standard.

The Guidelines ensure that websites are more accessible to persons with visual and other disabilities and do not affect digital content or the visual layout of the websites, mobile applications, or other online content and services. Blind computer users rely on screen reader voice output, braille output or magnification technology on computers and mobile devices. Like many individuals with mobility impairments, most blind computer users rely on a keyboard instead of a mouse for navigation.

W3C is an international community that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. The Web Accessibility Initiative is a program of the W3C that works with site owners, developers, people with disabilities and other interested parties to develop accessibility standards, including WCAG 2.0. More information is available at www.w3.org/WAI.

More information on The Motley Fool’s accessibility program is available the company’s new Accessibility Information Page.

For more information, contact Alison Southwick.

About The Motley Fool

Founded in 1993 in Alexandria, Va., by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool Holdings, Inc., is a financial services company dedicated to helping the world invest better. Reaching millions of people around the globe each month through its websites, books, newspaper column, television appearances, and innovative investing solutions. The Motley Fool’s operating companies include: The Motley Fool, LLC, and its international subsidiaries, which publish websites and newsletters about investing; Motley Fool Asset Management, LLC, which advises the Motley Fool Funds family of mutual funds; and Motley Fool Wealth Management, LLC, which provides personal investment advice and managed accounts to its clients.

Simplified Summary

This post is a press release from The Motley Fool.  The Motley Fool announced that it is making its website easier to use for disabled people.  The Motley Fool is a financial services company.  It is also making its mobile applications and emails easier to read .  The Motley Fool worked with blind investors on this project.  There was no lawsuit.  Instead, the company used a method called Structured Negotiation.  That method allows people to work together to solve legal problems.  [Back to top of this post]